Molly Monjauze was the personal assistant of Tupac Shakur on Death Row and worked closely with Tupac Shakur during his lifetime, and since his death has assisted the Shakur family with compiling unreleased Tupac materials. She's the author and co author of Tupac Remembered and the Tupac Legacy Book.


Tom Whalley former head of Warner Bros. Records. A product of the 1980s Warner Bros. Records A&R Department staff, Whalley first gained recognition working with New Wave superstars like The Cure and Modern English. He would then take his talents to head the A&R teams at Capitol Records, and eventually the fledgling Interscope Records. In 1989, Whalley was one of the execs hired to launch the record label. Within his first two years at the label, Whalley signed Tupac Shakur, who had recorded a demo while working as a dancer and feature MC with Oakland, California’s Digital Underground.


Tupac Shakur’s sister sue the executor of their late mother’s estate, accusing him of having “embezzled millions” and refusing to hand over personal items with “tremendous sentimental value” that belonged to the hip-hop legend, including gold records. In a lawsuit filed on Jan 10, 2022 in Los Angeles court, Sekyiwa Shakur and The Tupac Shakur Foundation accused Tom Whalley of “blatant violations” of his duties as the executor of Afeni Shakur-Davis’s estate, including allegedly installing himself in a key management role despite a conflict of interest.


George Pryce also known as Papa G is a Television Public Relations Manager, Magazine Publisher and Music Industry Publicist. He is best known for having been the first African American at PBS to head the publicity department at WNDT-TV (now WNET-TV) Channel 13, New York, in the late sixties, Publisher of MBM (Modern Black Men) Magazine in 1984-1987 and Manager of Communications and Media Relations at Death Row Records, Hollywood in the 1990s. In addition, Pryce owned and operated GPPR (George Pryce Public Relations) in both Los Angeles and New York City in the 1970s after having begun his career with Gardner, Jones and Cowell, in Chicago and Hill and Knowlton, Inc., in New York City. He's worked closely with Tupac Shakur on Death Row.


Gobi M. Rahimi a lifelong lover of music, he has produced and directed music videos for artists including Yoko Ono and Snoop Dogg. He also produced the star-studded music video documentary for the rerecording of, "Wake Up Everybody", the 1960's R & B classic by Harold Melvin and the Blue Notes. Drawing on his own multi-cultural background, he oversaw the collaboration of a diverse range of musical talents including Mary J. Blige, Marie Ben-Ari, Jadakiss, Jamie Fox, Missy Elliott, Wyclef Jean, with genius music producer Kenny "Babyface" Edmonds. The release benefited America Coming Together (ACT). Gobi developed a narrative film project based on the last 7 days in the life of slain rapper Tupac Shakur, entitled "7Dayz." However, in a settlement reached back in 2019, Rahimi was ordered to hand over all unseen footage and content of Tupac to the estate by March 2020.


BUSINESS ASSOCIATES

Tracy Danielle Robinson Producer, Director, Artist, Author, Motivational Speaker and is recognized as an inspirational thought leader, whose guidance has been carefully curated from her life’s experiences. Widely recognized in the entertainment industry for her bold, poignant and innovative music videos with influential and controversial talent from across the globe, Tracy’s work has earned acclaim for its sensitive portrayal of the humane side of hip hop life. Tracy's list of music video and production clients reads like a "Who's Who" in the world of hip hop entertainment. Her clients include Tupac, Ice Cube, Snoop Dogg, MoThugs, Layzie Bone, Jodeci, Lina Santiago, Queen Latifah, and Rick James. 


Atron Gregory is an entertainment business entrepreneur with executive producing and/or management credit on multiple multi platinum albums from Tupac Shakur, Digital Underground to Stanley Clarke and producing credits on four films including Tupac Shakur “Tha Early Years.”


John Singleton (January 6, 1968 – April 28, 2019) was an American film director, screenwriter and producer. He wrote and directed Boyz n the Hood in 1991, for which he was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Director, becoming, at age 24, the first African American and youngest person to have ever been nominated for that award. Singleton was a native of South Los Angeles, and many of his films, such as Poetic Justice (1993), Higher Learning (1995), and Baby Boy (2001), had themes which resonated with the urban population. He also directed the drama Rosewood (1997) and the action films Shaft (2000), 2 Fast 2 Furious (2003), and Four Brothers (2005). He co-created the television crime drama Snowfall. He was nominated for the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Directing for a Limited Series, Movie, or Dramatic Special for "The Race Card", the fifth episode of The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story.


J. Kevin Swain is an Emmy® and Grammy® nominated American television and film executive with over 30 years of creative and production leadership and experience. Born and raised in Los Angeles, his work has taken him to over 25 countries in Europe, South America, Africa, The Middle East, etc. Kevin Swain directed many music videos for Tupac Shakur during his time on Death Row. California Love Remix, Hit Em Up and I Ain't Mad At Cha just to name a few.


Leila Steinberg (born December 18, 1961) is a manager, business woman, educator, writer, poet and founder of Aim 4 The Heart non-profit dedicated to helping at-risk youth find their voice using an emotional literacy curriculum and writing workshops. She is best known as the artist mentor and first manager for Tupac Shakur. They met when he was a student in her writing workshop, The Microphone Sessions, in the Oakland Bay area.


Frank Alexander (born February 11, 1959-April 28, 2013) in the city of Chicago and raised in the projects with nine siblings.
On January 1978, Frank Joined The United States Marine Corps, and was stationed in Okinawa, Japan. After Leaving Japan, Frank served his final duty and was stationed in California where he would forever call home but the Marine Corpse was a steppingstone that allowed him to venture into many different directions that would help him start his own vitamin business become a personal trainer and in 1986 work as a jailer for the orange county jail system.
In 1989 Frank began his exciting journey into the world of body guarding his first job protecting in Iranian prince. Frank spent a total of 11 years in the Marine Corps ups afterwords he became a world class bodybuilder which ended in 1995 with him taking home separate second place.


In 1995 Frank began his work with Death Row Records were he would soon become Tupac's main bodyguard, it was Tupac that would give Frankie the nickname "Big Frank" and Frankie and Pac became close friends, following Tupac's death he would go on to write "Got Your Back" a book about his experience with the rapper. In the last year's of his life Frank released three documentaries Tupac Shakur "Before I Wake"...Tupac-Assassination and Tupac-Assassination 2 -Reckoning. In later years he continued his work in executive protection as chief of security for celebrities including Manny Pacquiao as well as working countless red carpet for award shows such as the Grammy's, the American Music, BET, MTV and Golden Globe awards.


Jimmy Iovine born (March 11, 1953) is an American entrepreneur, record executive, and media proprietor best known as the co-founder of Interscope Records. In 2006, Iovine and rapper-producer Dr. Dre founded Beats Electronics, which produces audio products and operated a now-defunct music streaming service. The company was purchased by Apple Inc. for $3 billion in May 2014.


SUGE KNIGHT

Marion Hugh "Suge" Knight Jr. (born April 19, 1965) is a former American music executive and the co-founder and former CEO of Death Row Records, who was a central figure in gangsta rap's commercial success. This feat is attributed to the record label's first two album releases: Dr. Dre's The Chronic in 1992 and Snoop Dogg's Doggystyle in 1993.

During 1995, Tupac Shakur began a prison sentence of up to four and a half years. Knight struck a deal with Shakur that October, paying his bail and freeing him from prison pending an appeal of his conviction, while signing him to Death Row Records. In 1996, the label released Shakur's greatest commercial success, All Eyez on Me. That September, after departing a Mike Tyson boxing match in Las Vegas, a group that included Knight and Shakur assaulted Orlando Anderson, a Southside Compton Crips gang member. Three hours later, someone shot into the car that Knight was driving and fatally wounded Shakur.


Dr. Dre left Death Row Records several months before Shakur's death, followed by Snoop Dogg 2 years later. Meanwhile, allegations mounted that Knight, beyond employing gang members, had often employed intimidation and violence in his business dealings. From the late 1990s into the early 2000s, Knight spent a few years incarcerated for assault convictions and associated violations of probation and parole. In September 2018, Knight pled no contest to voluntary manslaughter in a fatal 2015 hit-and-run, and was sentenced to 28 years in prison. Knight's conviction along with his previous felonies (stealing a camera, and also sending a harassing text message to Straight Outta Compton’s director, F Gary Gray) triggered California's three-strikes law.